Quick Answer: What Do I Need To Know Before Going To Therapy?

What is it like going to therapy for the first time?

You’ll Feel Like You’re Playing Catch-Up You may feel compelled to walk your therapist through a timeline of your heartbreaks.

Other than that, it doesn’t really feel like a real session.

The best sessions come once you’ve been going regularly and a good rapport has been developed..

Do therapists want you to cry?

The short answer is that no, not everyone does cry in counseling. However, pretty much everyone who participates in counseling does explore very strong emotions and most clients will experience tears at some point in their therapy journey.

What should I talk to my therapist about?

Explore exactly why therapy is difficult right now. … Talk about your past. … Discuss ways to troubleshoot telehealth problems. … Talk through the thoughts that feel small, stupid, or shameful. … Recount your dreams. … Safely walk through worst-case scenarios. … Journal between sessions.More items…•

What is not confidential with a therapist?

EXCEPTIONS TO CONFIDENTIALITY RULES It is important to note that a therapist will not automatically break confidentiality if a client reports thoughts about suicide. Typically, a client needs to state an intent to act on those thoughts and have a specific suicide plan before hospitalization is considered.

Can I trust therapist?

Trusting a therapist is essential for the work to go as far as it needs to. If you are guarded, then you are leaving your therapist with an incomplete picture of yourself. If your therapist is not trustworthy, then your progress may be limited and something needs to be done.

What should I not tell my therapist?

7 Things I ‘Shouldn’t’ Have Said to My Therapist — but Am Glad I…’To be honest, I’m probably not going to follow that advice’ … ‘I’m mad at you right now’ … ‘I kind of wish I could clone you’ … ‘When you said that, I literally wanted to quit therapy and stop talking to you forever’ … ‘This doesn’t feel right. … ‘I don’t know how much longer I can keep doing this’More items…•

What can I do to bring up my therapist?

Lulls in conversation are also a great opportunity to reflect on your therapy experience thus far: Talk about what you like (or don’t like) about sessions. Acknowledge some of the progress you’ve made. Discuss experiences from your past you’d like to excavate a bit more.

Can I tell my therapist I killed someone?

If the therapist is convinced you are not currently a danger to anyone they can not divulge your confession to murder. … Most of your information with your therapist is strictly confidential, but if you reveal that you are a danger to either yourself or somebody else then it is their duty to report this.

Can you tell your therapist too much?

A normal part of the psychotherapy process is something therapists call “disclosure.” This is simply your telling the therapist your thoughts, feelings, and experiences, which is a normal process of most types of psychotherapy. … Disclosing “too much,” however, is not that uncommon an experience.

How do I talk to my therapist for the first time?

3 Tips to Remember for Your First Therapy SessionBe honest. You waste both your own time and that of the professional if you’re less than honest with them. … Don’t jump to conclusions, but trust your gut. Sometimes we let our first impressions get the better of us. … Be nervous, it’s okay. It’s okay to be nervous if this is your first time seeing a therapist.

Should you tell your therapist everything?

The short answer is that you can tell your therapist anything – and they hope that you do. It’s a good idea to share as much as possible, because that’s the only way they can help you.

What therapists look for in clients?

Factors about the therapist: Would I enjoy doing this piece of work with this person? Do I feel equipped clinically to help this person? Do I currently have enough personal and emotional resources to care for myself so that I may care for this person? Do I have space in my schedule to take on another ongoing client?

Can you tell your therapist about a crime?

Privileged Material When the therapist-patient privilege does apply, it covers patients’ statements, and often therapists’ diagnoses and notes. … It can even include admissions of criminal liability: In several jurisdictions, a therapist cannot report someone who confesses to a crime. (United States v.